Digital Music Trends – Episode 47

This week: an interview with Fred McIntyre, VP of product at CBS Interactive, focused primarily on Last.fm. In the news: the iTunes store widens its lead as the most popular music retailer in the US, Google is ready to take on Apple on the music front via Android and Simplify, Cakewalking is a software that allows blind musicians and producers to navigate through complex audio platforms like Sonar, in Spain the revenues from the tax on blank media have outstripped the mechanical revenues made from music sales and finally last week’s debate at Music Tank in London demonstrated that the physical product is not dead.

Episode 47 by digitalmusictrends

iTunes Store widens its lead as the largest music retailer in the US
http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/content_display/magazine/upfront/e3i12fe2557a9382597671a522cc1cc901d

Billboard Business reported on the new market share figures for music sales in the US – and the most striking one is that that iTunes is widening its lead and dominates the field. Apple’s music store went from a 21.4% share in 2008 to a 26.7% share in 2009. The trends in the physical market were reversed, with Wal-Mart losing 2.5% and settling with 12.5% – which was probably by all means a calculated risk since the company keeps reducing the shelf space reserved for CDs, and along the same lines the Best Buy share has dipped to 8.7%. The Amazon Mp3 store rose by half a point but is only at 1.3% – a far cry from Amazon’s and the labels’ aspirations and surprising given that often their prices are slightly lower than on iTunes.

Google taking on Apple on the music front as well?
http://www.itproportal.com/portal/news/article/2010/5/21/google-acquired-simplify-media-launch-android-music-service/
http://techcrunch.com/2010/05/20/google-buys-simplify-media-to-power-music-syncing-for-new-itunes-competitor/
http://techcrunch.com/2010/05/20/um-did-google-just-quietly-launch-a-web-based-itunes-competitor-yep/

ItProPortal and TechCrunch last Friday reported on Google’s latest announcements regarding its Android 2.2 or Froyo mobile operating system. Apparently Google is planning to introduce music in its Marketplace with the next upgrade and the process would be very similar to what happens today on the iPhone: you’d be able to find the music, buy it and download it directly on your device. At the moment there are no details as to which labels will be licensing their music for the service but with overall sales for Android-powered handsets overtaking the iPhone’s in the US it’s certainly a market that I would assume all labels would want to get a piece of.  
In another even more intriguing note – Google announced that it acquired the start-up Simplify media – a platform that allows you to manage your music and photos across different devices and pieces of software including remote access from the web. Simplify had announced a change in direction and pulled its app from itunes back in March which suggests that the deal with Google took place then, and is planning to release a desktop app that will allow you to access your computer’s drm-free music collection from your handset. If this turns out to be a software that is solid and user-friendly it could be a real blow to Apple – the Cupertino company is apparently working on a music locker system in the cloud but is yet to announce anything officially. Google has never been great at handling Media, although Android 2.1 brought a number of positive changes to the User interface for its media player – whether the implementation is up to scratch to gather a large user base is anyone’s guess!

Digital Technology Allowing blind people to record music
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704852004575258444254422092.html?mod=WSJ_ArtsEnt_LifestyleArtEnt_9
www.dancingdots.com

I came across a great article on the Wall Street Journal this week that I really wanted to include in the line-up for the show. It’s about a piece of software called Cake Talking developed by the company Dancing Dots – which basically allows blind musicians to navigate and use music production software. The article is based on the experience of blind musician Raul Midon who although extremely accomplished was unable to use normal production tools because most of them are based on icons and screen prompts – just think at your usual Logic or ProTools window. CakeTalking  now allows him to produce his tracks the way he wants them and tweak with the sounds in a way he didn’t previously thought possible – it directs him on the screen and reads out the different commands, and through a combination of these prompts and keyboard short-cuts Raul is now able to create complex pieces without anyone’s help. I just though this was a really great story on how technology can make a difference for musicians, although the development of these platforms is probably slowed down by the fact that since they are very niche products they are hard to monetize and I can imagine that there isn’t a great deal of funding for them… At the moment – by looking at the Dancingdots.com website – the CakeWalking software is available specifically for Sonar but I guess that there’s no reason why it could not be applied to other platforms in the near future. 

In Spain revenues from the Blank Media tax overtake mechanical royalties from music sales.
http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/content_display/industry/e3i3b8cb13fe213cb83d754397e5db3c4bf
http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-05-11/spanish-levy-on-cds-dvds-may-breach-eu-law-court-adviser-says.html

Billboard reports that in Spain the amount collected by authors body SGAE through the tax imposed on the sale of blank CD and DVD has overtaken the amount collected through mechanical royalties that derive from music sales. It received 27.7 million euros from the tax but only 20.5 million euros through mechanical royalties. According to the IFPI the value of the Spanish music market declined by 14.3% in 2009 to 177 million euros. On the 11th of May Business Week had run a piece on how the European Union is pondering on whether this tax is acceptable or whether it breaches EU regulations. The case was brought up by Padawan, a Spanish maker of DVDs and CDs who refused to pay and was brought to court by the SGAE. Advocate General Verica Trstenjak of the European Court of Justice said that “A levy in favor of authors, artists and producers may not be applied indiscriminately,” to buyers who have clearly acquired the data media for purposes other than copying others’ work. Now her advice is generally followed by the court so if the ruling was in Padawan’s favor the SGAE could find itself deprived of a very important source of income.

The physical album takes centre stage at the Music Tank debate.
http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/content_display/industry/e3idbde8a913c8837424e12a0d45f78cd6a

And now onto another piece from Billboard Business – they strangely seem to have better coverage of European music business events than most other news organizations ba
sed in Europe. This is a report on the Music Tank debate that took place in London last week and focused around the physical formats. the event was called “Never Mind the Box Set: The Album Post-iTunes” and aimed at analyzing the future of the album. During the debate a study by the Future Business Research Group was discussed which is basically the first-ever industry-wide segmentation of the British music-buying public. This study divides the music-buying public into a number of groups to give a few examples the “traditional fanatic” – slightly older tech savvy and obsessed with physical products – the “going digital” that has just moved onto digital and may pirate some content the “digital convert” that is following the totally legal digital route. These groups and the correlation between the groups and the amount of money they spend of music is meant to be a guideline as to where the Music Industry should concentrate its efforts. In regards to the call for innovation at the record-store level to drive digital consumption Gennaro Castaldo head of press at HMV spoke of an upcoming service by the chain which would allow customers to receive a legitimate digital copies of the songs they just bought on CD. Others talked about the importance of vinyl, or merchandise and of box-sets for higher-margin products. What’s certain is that physical is not going anywhere and that although digital is set to increase and has already conquered the singles market album sales are going to happen primarily in the physical world for quite some time.

Soundcloud Milestone announced.
http://blog.soundcloud.com/2010/05/18/1000000/

The Soundcloud team announced last Tuesday that the company reached the milestone of one million users! I’ve been hosting the show on Soundcloud as well as on the usual RSS podcast feed for the past six months and I couldn’t be happier with them! Mhh now the only trouble is whether to still call it a start-up or not, what do you think?

And that’s all for this week, i really hope you enjoyed the show. You can find all the links to the stories in the show notes which are both embedded in the Mp3 file and on the blog at www.digitalmusictrends.com. You can also find the podcast on the Music Void at www.themusicvoid.com. Please email me with any comment or feedback – the address is digitalmusictrends@gmail.com. Next week-end I’m going to be at the Future Music Camp in Mannheim which is super-exciting, I will be conducting a workshop on Interactive Music so if you’re planning to be there give me a shout – otherwise I’ll tell you all about it on the next episode of digital music trends. This has been Andrea Leonelli – have a great week and ‘Till Next time!

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Digital Music Trends – Episode 47

This week: an interview with Fred McIntyre, VP of product at CBS Interactive, focused primarily on Last.fm. In the news: the iTunes store widens its lead as the most popular music retailer in the US, Google is ready to take on Apple on the music front via Android and Simplify, Dancing Dots and Cakewalking a software that allows blind musicians and producers to navigate through complex audio platforms like Sonar, in Spain the revenues from the tax on blank media have outstripped the mechanical revenues made from music sales and finally last week’s debate at Music Tank in London demonstrates that the physical product is not dead

iTunes Store widens its lead as the largest music retailer in the US http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/content_display/magazine/upfront/e3i12fe2557a9382597671a522cc1cc901d

Billboard Business reported on the new market share figures for music sales in the US – and the most striking one is that that iTunes is widening its lead and dominates the field. Apple’s music store went from a 21.4% share in 2008 to a 26.7% share in 2009. The trends in the physical market were reversed, with Wal-Mart losing 2.5% and settling with 12.5% – which was probably by all means a calculated risk since the company keeps reducing the shelf space reserved for CDs, and along the same lines the Best Buy share has dipped to 8.7%. The Amazon Mp3 store rose by half a point but is only at 1.3% – a far cry from Amazon’s and the labels’ aspirations and surprising given that often their prices are slightly lower than on iTunes.

Google taking on Apple on the music front as well? http://www.itproportal.com/portal/news/article/2010/5/21/google-acquired-simplify-media-launch-android-music-service

http://techcrunch.com/2010/05/20/google-buys-simplify-media-to-power-music-syncing-for-new-itunes-competitor/

http://techcrunch.com/2010/05/20/um-did-google-just-quietly-launch-a-web-based-itunes-competitor-yep/

ItProPortal and TechCrunch last Friday reported on Google’s latest announcements regarding its Android 2.2 or Froyo mobile operating system. Apparently Google is planning to introduce music in its Marketplace with the next upgrade and the process would be very similar to what happens today on the iPhone: you’d be able to find the music, buy it and download it directly on your device. At the moment there are no details as to which labels will be licensing their music for the service but with overall sales for Android-powered handsets overtaking the iPhone’s in the US it’s certainly a market that I would assume all labels would want to get a piece of. In another even more intriguing note – Google announced that it acquired the start-up Simplify media – a platform that allows you to manage your music and photos across different devices and pieces of software including remote access from the web. Simplify had announced a change in direction and pulled its app from itunes back in March which suggests that the deal with Google took place then, and is planning to release a desktop app that will allow you to access your computer’s drm-free music collection from your handset. If this turns out to be a software that is solid and user-friendly it could be a real blow to Apple – the Cupertino company is apparently working on a music locker system in the cloud but is yet to announce anything officially. Google has never been great at handling Media, although Android 2.1 brought a number of positive changes to the User interface for its media player – whether the implementation is up to scratch to gather a large user base is anyone’s guess!

Digital Technology Allowing blind people to record music http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704852004575258444254422092.html?mod=WSJ_ArtsEnt_LifestyleArtEnt_9 www.dancingdots.com

I came across a great article on the Wall Street Journal this week that I really wanted to include in the line-up for the show. It’s about a piece of software called Cake Talking developed by the company Dancing Dots – which basically allows blind musicians to navigate and use music production software. The article is based on the experience of blind musician Raul Midon who although extremely accomplished was unable to use normal production tools because most of them are based on icons and screen prompts – just think at your usual Logic or ProTools window. CakeTalking  now allows him to produce his tracks the way he wants them and tweak with the sounds in a way he didn’t previously thought possible – it directs him on the screen and reads out the different commands, and through a combination of these prompts and keyboard short-cuts Raul is now able to create complex pieces without anyone’s help. I just though this was a really great story on how technology can make a difference for musicians, although the development of these platforms is always hampered by the fact that being very niche products they are hard to monetize and I can imagine that there isn’t a great deal of funding for them… At the moment – by looking at the Dancingdots.com website – the CakeWalking software is available specifically for Sonar but I guess that there’s no reason why it could not be applied to other platforms in the near future.

In Spain revenues from the Blank Media tax overtake mechanical royalties from music sales.

http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/content_display/industry/e3i3b8cb13fe213cb83d754397e5db3c4bf

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2010-05-11/spanish-levy-on-cds-dvds-may-breach-eu-law-court-adviser-says.html

Billboard reports that in Spain the amount collected by authors body SGAE through the tax imposed on the sale of blank CD and DVD has overtaken the amount collected through mechanical royalties that derive from music sales. It received 27.7 million euros from the tax but only 20.5 million euros through mechanical royalties. According to the IFPI the value of the Spanish music market declined by 14.3% in 2009 to 177 million euros. On the 11th of May Business Week had run a piece on how the European Union is pondering on whether this tax is acceptable or whether it breaches EU regulations. The case was brought up by Padawan, a Spanish maker of DVDs and CDs who refused to pay and was brought to court by the SGAE. Advocate General Verica Trstenjak of the European Court of Justice said that “A levy in favor of authors, artists and producers may not be applied indiscriminately,” to buyers who have clearly acquired the data media for purposes other than copying others’ work. Now her advice is generally followed by the court so if the ruling was in Padawan’s favor the SGAE could find itself deprived of a very important source of income.

A discussion on the future of physical content.

http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/content_display/industry/e3idbde8a913c8837424e12a0d45f78cd6a

And now onto another piece from Billboard Business – they strangely seem to have better coverage of European music business events than most other news organizations based in Europe. This is a report on the Music Tank debate that took place in London last week and focused around the physical formats. the event was called “Never Mind the Box Set: The Album Post-iTunes” and aimed at analyzing the future of the album. During the debate a study by the Future Business Research Group was discussed which is basically the first-ever industry-wide segmentation of the British music-buying public. This study divides the music-buying public into a number of groups to give a few examples the “traditional fanatic” – slightly older tech savvy and obsessed with physical products – the “going digital” that has just moved onto digital and may pirate some content the “digital convert” that is following the totally legal digital route. These groups and the correlation between the groups and the amount of money they spend of music is meant to be a guideline as to where the Music Industry should concentrate its efforts. In regards to the call for innovation at the record-store level to drive digital consumption Gennaro Castaldo head of press at HMV spoke of an upcoming service by the chain which would allow customers to receive a legitimate digital copies of the songs they just bought on CD. Others talked about the importance of vinyl, or merchandise and of box-sets for higher-margin products. What’s certain is that physical is not going anywhere and that although digital is set to increase and has already conquered the singles market album sales are going to happen primarily in the physical world for quite some time.

Soundcloud Congrats http://blog.soundcloud.com/2010/05/18/1000000/

The Soundcloud team announced last Tuesday that the company reached the milestone of one million users! I’ve been hosting the show on Soundcloud as well as on the usual RSS podcast feed for the past six months and I couldn’t be happier with them! Mhh now the only trouble is whether to still call it a start-up or not, what do you think?

And that’s all for this week, i really hope you enjoyed the show. You can find all the links to the stories in the show notes which are both embedded in the Mp3 file and on the blog at www.digitalmusictrends.com. You can also find the podcast on the Music Void at www.themusicvoid.com. Please email me with any comment or feedback – the address is digitalmusictrends@gmail.com. Next week-end I’m going to be at the Future Music Camp in Mannheim which is super-exciting, I will be conducting a workshop on Interactive Music so if you’re planning to be there give me a shout – otherwise I’ll tell you all about it on the next episode of digital music trends. This has been Andrea Leonelli – have a great week and ‘Till Next time!

Digital Music Trends – Episode 46


This week on the show an interview with Gregory Kris, CEO of Decibel.net a company that focuses on gathering rich music metadata. Also in the news: Limewire loses big time in court against the RIAA in what may be a very significant ruling, Warner Teams Up with Myxer, the Echo Nest partners with Play.me and finally a small window on what happened at the Great Escape conference in Brighton. I’m going to briefly cover the Psonar controversy, the thoughts of the VP of Digital at Universal Music Group international Francis Keeling on subscription and piracy and the potential of China for UK companies.

Episode 46 by digitalmusictrends

 

But let’s start with this week’s interview with Gregory Kris, CEO of Decibel.net (here is not a transcript but a more conicise summary of some of the subjects covered in the interview):

First of all, how did Decibel start out and what is the idea behind the company?

Our founder is a music fanatic and software architect. He got the idea when he tried to digitise his own collection, and found that the software was in its infancy and all the information was in silos. The idea was to provide knowledge and navigation in one place, and to make the listening experience totally compelling for digital music.

The product was made with many issues in mind. First was the need for knowledge — to duplicate the record notes. Then came the idea of navigating a typically-large digital music collection. The next was in finding music online. Then there’s the “English-only” nature of the music market, with many interested people left out.

As listeners we typically use separate programs or web sites for each function, but if you think about it, all of these issues are part of a single, musical ecosystem. The job of Decibel is to allow all items to function together smoothly, and that’s a pain-point right now. We want to power the next generation of digital music.

The focus of the company is on music discovery, a field that is now expanding on various fronts including that recommendation services. How does decibel spur music discovery?

Decibel furnishes the raw material for recommendations, but more important, it lets listeners follow their own trail of interest. There is no field where people love details more than music, and Decibel allows listeners to make their own discoveries. Social connections are interesting, but listeners may also want to follow the guitarist, or the piece or the label … or whatever else strikes them. We make no assumptions — we simply furnish people with the tools to do what they want, and can find things even if they’re not on the cover. Decibel can be used to discover your own collection, but equally, it makes online services easier to use. All of a sudden, sellers are music experts.

How do you gather the information that you include in the music? You talk about listing all session musicians, backing vocalists, producers etc for a specific recording but often this information is not even available to the original record label – do you need to carry out a lot of detective work on some of the recordings?

We often have better information than the record companies. Record companies are in the business of making music, and don’t always have the time to look after data. In fact, we view them as potential clients, since complete data will help them make better sales.

We get the information wherever we can find it, and sometimes spend ridiculous amounts of time on small details. The sleeve notes are all-important, but we also go to reference works, blogs, and any sources that will help. Generally, we have a 30,000-foot view of music data, so we can make the best guess if we need to. Nobody’s perfect. We often find that the sleeve notes have the wrong song authors, and we’ve even found a record where they got the artist wrong (Joe Turner / Big Joe Turner). We’ve asked everyone to be extra-critical of our own information, and we make a point of putting fixes in place immediately.

Is the information provided by Decibel for now only accessed by larger organizations or is it accessible through specific software I could use so that if I pop a CD in my drive that has been indexed by Decibel I can access all that wealth of information?

Decibel is accessed through an API. Using this model, anyone can write software to use the data for whatever purpose they need. For instance, Decibel has a program that recognises CDs, and rips to MP3 and FLAC with all the rich information in the tags. We see a wealth of consumer products coming from the same source. The same way that PCs have the “Intel Inside” sticker, we see the products having the “Data by Decibel” label.

I imagine that your client base is split – on the one side the content creators that want you to index their tracks on Decibel and on the other the service providers who want to access the content. In that respect are these two forces equivalent or is one more predominant than the other in terms of your business model? You can’t have one without the other! The move to digital music has caused some friction between the producers and consumers, when really, their interests are totally shared. Die-hard fans can’t get enough music, and creators need everyone to know that they’re there. The problem is that something has been lost in the translation on the way to digital music. The physical product is going away, and traditional magazines and advertising are going through turmoil as well. We look at Decibel as the missing part of the equation. Good information lets creators sell something of similar value to the original product, and good navigation lets listeners find what they want. Everyone wins.

What are your plans for the service in terms of the information you hold? Is your goal to keep distributing solely via the Cloud or would you like a tie-in with Mp3s or other upcoming interactive formats? We plan to deliver data from the Cloud, since that easiest and most convenient. However, we have no limits on the products we will produce. As new things are invented, Decibel will be part of them.

Most of the data will be dynamic, though some will go into more static products such as MP3 tags or eBay listings. We already have tag formats for MP3 and FLAC, where users can get full information and link back to Decibel — without breaking players like iTunes or Winamp. In fact, listeners can even get the tags in their own language. This is all proven technology. And we’re happy to be a part of any product that uses information.

Labels work with proprietary and closed systems to create their products so the metadata is fragmented and for example I can safely assume that EMI can’t access Warner’s systems to look up the product details, engineers and backing vocalists of a specific track. Do you think that Decibel may finally provide not only consumers but also professionals working in the music industry with a solution that may help resolve issues regarding licensing and sample clearances for example in a more straightforward way?

We are looking to make Decibel the reference database for the music industry. EMI might be able to look at Warner, but it’s true that too much data lives in silos. There’s one database for CD recognition and another for publishing rights, when it all deals with the same material. A laser focus can be helpful, but you never know why people will want certain information. Producers may want to find songs for their performers to sing, DJs may want to research their programmes, and fans may want to follow someone they like. We don’t make any assumptions. We gather any and all information, and make sure that it’s linked to work with all the other information. At this point we’re in discussions with the royalty agencies to make sure we have the information they need, as well as all other people in the music industry who we want to work with in the future.

 

And now for the news:

1) Limewire loses big time in court

The big story this week was definitely the RIAA’s win in court against Limewire. U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood, for the Southern District of New York, on Tuesday found Limewire liable for copyright infringement. CNET quotes parts of the sentence written by the judge “The evidence demonstrates that [Lime Wire] optimized LimeWire’s features to ensure that users can download digital recordings, the majority of which are protected by copyright,”  “And that [Lime Wire] assisted users in committing infringement.” What is really interesting is that the judge did not only declare Limewire and the Limewire group as responsible but also held its main owner and CEO Mark Gorton accountable and he may face having to pay part of the charges himself if and when they are handed down. Cnet makes the interesting point that this may prevent investors and VCs to invest in start-ups that don’t have all the necessary licenses to distribute or aid in the distribution of copyrighted material, whilst ZDNet’s Sam Diaz wonders whether there will always be way for the entrepreneur to get around a ruling like this. Ars Technical also has a really great in-depth analysis of Limewire’s history and of the legal proceedings connected to the company so go and check that out, the link is in the shownotes. Main thing to take away from this is that even the most anti-RIAA people out there could not deny that Limewire was basing it business on people downloading copyrighted material and the NPD in a recent survey reveal an astounding figure –  58% of all people surveyed who were filesharing indicated that they were using Limewire, and it’s not hard to believe given that the software amassed over 200 million downloads per year. The RIAA said it will seek the maximum compensation that nowadays is set at 150,000 dollars per work downloaded, which is enough to sink Limewire many times over. The RIAA may also seek an injunction to get the company to shut its doors as soon as possible. Whilst I have been known to maintain on the show that it’s pointless to try and get all P2P networks shut and that P2P has its place in the grand scheme of things I cannot say that I feel any sympaythy for a company that built its business model around the exchange of copyrighted material.

2) Warner Music Teams up with Myxer

http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7018674084

Mobile music platform Myxer has found a new partner in Warner Music. The major has agreed to partner with Myxer to promote its music to the 34 million users of the service. The deal gets Warner artists’ on Myxer’s MobileStage platform where on one side they can stay in touch with the fans directly via mobile messaging and on the other fans can gain access to mobile-friendly audio material, videos, wallpapers and ring-tones via their handsets. The content will be available from www.myxer.com/warnermusic.
And now onto another partnership as Billboard Business reports that the Echo Nest inked a deal with the Play.me service by Dada entertainment, and this has lots of exciting implications. First of all if you haven’t heard of Play.me it’s a streaming service that offers 5 hours of free streaming per week before asking you to pay a $5 or $10 monthly fee to continue listening – and it features tracks from EMI, Sony and many indies. The Echo Nest and its API allow developers to create really amazing apps but the problem was that up until now many of those never saw the light of day because app developers had to negotiate licensing deals for the music on their own and most of them did not want to hear of it or didn’t have the resources to delve in such a complex field. By partnering with Play.me the Echo Nest is providing its developers with an invaluable source of pre-cleared music that presents the same restrictions and limitations of the original service. The great thing though is that if users decided to pay for the premium access through the app or because they are using the app all the time both the App developer and the Echo Nest will receive a cut of that. The ability of tapping into this vast amount of music is likely to spur the release of many more apps based on the EchoNest platform – as a Wired article points out – and the developers will be able to focus on creating amazing programs rather than worrying about other issues. I’m personally a big fan of the Echo Nest and see endless potential to what people can do with their engine so I can’t wait to see some of these new apps!

4) And finally I’d like to end the show with some flash coverage of The great escape conference that took place last week-end in Brighton:

a) Best of British Music Start-up and the Psonar controversy.

First of all let’s talk about the Best of British Digital Music Start-ups session. This involved Silence Media, Psonar, Music Metric, Music Glue, Pledge Music and RjDj. These represent a wide variety of business models with the advertising platform, music locker service, direct-to-fan marketing and music app development all in the picture. But a company that caused a little bit of controversy as reported by Music Ally and Mobile Entertainment was Psonar. Psonar is a music locker service that works in principle in a way not dissimilar to other companies like Tunesbag for example. It lets users upload their entire music collection and then listen to it from any device – thus creating your own mini version of Spotify. The interesting thing is that you can browse other people’s collections and search for tracks that are not part of yours – the catch being that you can only listen to 30 seconds of any given track. The company then provides you with a link to buy the track from a legitimate store if you realize that you like it. Naturally music locker services have come under fire lately as there is no proof that the music that is uploaded is actually yours and has been acquired by legitimate means. Mobile Entertainment reports that Mark Mulligan – analyst at Forrester who was also one of the judges for the session remarked on the lack of licenses for the service and on how it’s effectively becoming an enemy of the labels that should instead be partners. Francis Keeling also remarked on the fact that the company is not legally able to do what they are doing when the discussion was opened to questions from the floor. I personally think that music lockers are just a phase – why if you have the option of having all the music that was ever made on one service like spotify would you go through the trouble of pirating the music and then uploading it all to a server in the cloud? it seems like many users would choose the convenience of paying a monthly fee and not being limited by the size of their own collections. I may be wrong – but unless someone like Apple comes up with a working model of the locker that gets over the licensing hurdles of proof of ownership I see the future as being a service like Spotify or We7 and not a locker service.

b) Francis Keeling VP of Digital At UMGI

Francis Keeling – the VP of Digital at Universal Music Group International took part in one of the sessions at the Great Escape and his remarks were reported by a number of outlets including the BBC and Bilboard Business. According to Billboard, Keeling stressed his belief in subscription models like  Spotify, backed the freemium model and remarked on how the slow pace of acquiring licenses is essentially stalling the industry. The BBC article instead focused on Keeling’s take on Piracy – that is still clearly seen as a number one enemy in the creation of a healthy business – a problem that needs to be tackled especially in those countries, like Spain and Italy, where there is the feeling the music is free and therefore there is no reason to buy it. Keeling also backed the Digital Economy Act – telling delegates on the subject of the yet-to-be-determined sanctions that “The solution needs to be fair, proportionate and implemented well,”

And finally there is a really interesting article on the CMU website about the session focusing on the Chinese music market. This year five of the participants in the Brit Council’s UK Young Music Entrepreneur Award were selected to take a trip to China at the British Council’s expense in order to understand the market and develop business proposals that could expand their own companies into China. These included representatives from well-known companies like Mixcloud and Songkick. The participants found several issues that stifle the development of a healthy music market in China. First of all although the population is around a billion – that does not mean that there are a billion music fans and although the music scene is expanding it’s still an underground phenomenon, second there is lesser chance of endorsement by large international brands because of the success of local equivalents such as Baidu for example, third even though the number of music events has increased exponentially there are still only 5,000 concerts per year, fourth the issue of government control and censorship is still a pressing one. Nevertheless in spite of the challenges – all five participants remarked on how many opportunities there are in China to create a business and expand it quickly given that many of the major players that already dominate the market in the west are simply not there. Certainly an interesting experiment from the British Council!

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Digital Music Trends – Episode 46

This week on the show an interview with Gregory Kris, CEO of Decibel.net a company that focuses on gathering rich music metadata, also in the news: Limewire loses big time in court against the RIAA in what may be a very significant ruling, Warner Teams Up with Myxer, the Echo Nest partners with Play.me and finally a small window on what happened at the Great Escape conference in Brighton. I’m going to briefly cover the Psonar controversy, the thoughts of the VP of Digital at Universal Music Group international Francis Keeling on subscription and piracy and the potential of China for UK companies.

But let’s start with this week’s interview with Gregory Kris, CEO of Decibel.net (here is not a transcript but a more conicise summary of some of the subjects covered in the interview):

First of all, how did Decibels start out and what is the idea behind the company?

Our founder is a music fanatic and software architect. He got the idea when he tried to digitise his own collection, and found that the software was in its infancy and all the information was in silos. The idea was to provide knowledge and navigation in one place, and to make the listening experience totally compelling for digital music.

The product was made with many issues in mind. First was the need for knowledge — to duplicate the record notes. Then came the idea of navigating a typically-large digital music collection. The next was in finding music online. Then there’s the “English-only” nature of the music market, with many interested people left out.

As listeners we typically use separate programs or web sites for each function, but if you think about it, all of these issues are part of a single, musical ecosystem. The job of Decibel is to allow all items to function together smoothly, and that’s a pain-point right now. We want to power the next generation of digital music.

The focus of the company is on music discovery, a field that is now expanding on various fronts including that recommendation services. How does decibel spur music discovery? Decibel furnishes the raw material for recommendations, but more important, it lets listeners follow their own trail of interest. There is no field where people love details more than music, and Decibel allows listeners to make their own discoveries. Social connections are interesting, but listeners may also want to follow the guitarist, or the piece or the label … or whatever else strikes them. We make no assumptions — we simply furnish people with the tools to do what they want, and can find things even if they’re not on the cover. Decibel can be used to discover your own collection, but equally, it makes online services easier to use. All of a sudden, sellers are music experts.

How do you gather the information that you include in the music? You talk about listing all session musicians, backing vocalists, producers etc for a specific recording but often this information is not even available to the original record label – do you need to carry out a lot of detective work on some of the recordings?

We often have better information than the record companies. Record companies are in the business of making music, and don’t always have the time to look after data. In fact, we view them as potential clients, since complete data will help them make better sales.

We get the information wherever we can find it, and sometimes spend ridiculous amounts of time on small details. The sleeve notes are all-important, but we also go to reference works, blogs, and any sources that will help. Generally, we have a 30,000-foot view of music data, so we can make the best guess if we need to. Nobody’s perfect. We often find that the sleeve notes have the wrong song authors, and we’ve even found a record where they got the artist wrong (Joe Turner / Big Joe Turner). We’ve asked everyone to be extra-critical of our own information, and we make a point of putting fixes in place immediately.

Is the information provided by Decibel for now only accessed by larger organizations or is it accessible through specific software I could use so that if I pop a CD in my drive that has been indexed by Decibel I can access all that wealth of information?

Decibel is accessed through an API. Using this model, anyone can write software to use the data for whatever purpose they need. For instance, Decibel has a program that recognises CDs, and rips to MP3 and FLAC with all the rich information in the tags. We see a wealth of consumer products coming from the same source. The same way that PCs have the “Intel Inside” sticker, we see the products having the “Data by Decibel” label.

I imagine that your client base is split – on the one side the content creators that want you to index their tracks on Decibel and on the other the service providers who want to access the content. In that respect are these two forces equivalent or is one more predominant than the other in terms of your business model? You can’t have one without the other! The move to digital music has caused some friction between the producers and consumers, when really, their interests are totally shared. Die-hard fans can’t get enough music, and creators need everyone to know that they’re there. The problem is that something has been lost in the translation on the way to digital music. The physical product is going away, and traditional magazines and advertising are going through turmoil as well. We look at Decibel as the missing part of the equation. Good information lets creators sell something of similar value to the original product, and good navigation lets listeners find what they want. Everyone wins.

What are your plans for the service in terms of the information you hold? Is your goal to keep distributing solely via the Cloud or would you like a tie-in with Mp3s or other upcoming interactive formats? We plan to deliver data from the Cloud, since that easiest and most convenient. However, we have no limits on the products we will produce. As new things are invented, Decibel will be part of them.

Most of the data will be dynamic, though some will go into more static products such as MP3 tags or eBay listings. We already have tag formats for MP3 and FLAC, where users can get full information and link back to Decibel — without breaking players like iTunes or Winamp. In fact, listeners can even get the tags in their own language. This is all proven technology. And we’re happy to be a part of any product that uses information.

Labels work with proprietary and closed systems to create their products so the metadata is fragmented and for example I can safely assume that EMI can’t access Warner’s systems to look up the product details, engineers and backing vocalists of a specific track. Do you think that Decibel may finally provide not only consumers but also professionals working in the music industry with a solution that may help resolve issues regarding licensing and sample clearances for example in a more straightforward way?

We are looking to make Decibel the reference database for the music industry. EMI might be able to look at Warner, but it’s true that too much data lives in silos. There’s one database for CD recognition and another for publishing rights, when it all deals with the same material. A laser focus can be helpful, but you never know why people will want certain information. Producers may want to find songs for their performers to sing, DJs may want to research their programmes, and fans may want to follow someone they like. We don’t make any assumptions. We gather any and all information, and make sure that it’s linked to work with all the other information. At this point we’re in discussions with the royalty agencies to make sure we have the information they need, as well as all other people in the music industry who we want to work with in the future.

And now for the news:

1) Limewire loses big time in court

The big story this week was definitely the RIAA’s win in court against Limewire. U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood, for the Southern District of New York, on Tuesday found Limewire liable for copyright infringement. CNET quotes parts of the sentence written by the judge “The evidence demonstrates that [Lime Wire] optimized LimeWire’s features to ensure that users can download digital recordings, the majority of which are protected by copyright,”  “And that [Lime Wire] assisted users in committing infringement.” What is really interesting is that the judge did not only declare Limewire and the Limewire group as responsible but also held its main owner and CEO Mark Gorton accountable and he may face having to pay part of the charges himself if and when they are handed down. Cnet makes the interesting point that this may prevent investors and VCs to invest in start-ups that don’t have all the necessary licenses to distribute or aid in the distribution of copyrighted material, whilst ZDNet’s Sam Diaz wonders whether there will always be way for the entrepreneur to get around a ruling like this. Ars Technical also has a really great in-depth analysis of Limewire’s history and of the legal proceedings connected to the company so go and check that out, the link is in the shownotes. Main thing to take away from this is that even the most anti-RIAA people out there could not deny that Limewire was basing it business on people downloading copyrighted material and the NPD in a recent survey reveal an astounding figure –  58% of all people surveyed who were filesharing indicated that they were using Limewire, and it’s not hard to believe given that the software amassed over 200 million downloads per year. The RIAA said it will seek the maximum compensation that nowadays is set at 150,000 dollars per work downloaded, which is enough to sink Limewire many times over. The RIAA may also seek an injunction to get the company to shut its doors as soon as possible. Whilst I have been known to maintain on the show that it’s pointless to try and get all P2P networks shut and that P2P has its place in the grand scheme of things I cannot say that I feel any sympaythy for a company that built its business model around the exchange of copyrighted material.

2) Warner Music Teams up with Myxer

http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7018674084

Mobile music platform Myxer has found a new partner in Warner Music. The major has agreed to partner with Myxer to promote its music to the 34 million users of the service. The deal gets Warner artists’ on Myxer’s MobileStage platform where on one side they can stay in touch with the fans directly via mobile messaging and on the other fans can gain access to mobile-friendly audio material, videos, wallpapers and ring-tones via their handsets. The content will be available from www.myxer.com/warnermusic.
And now onto another partnership as Billboard Business reports that the Echo Nest inked a deal with the Play.me service by Dada entertainment, and this has lots of exciting implications. First of all if you haven’t heard of Play.me it’s a streaming service that offers 5 hours of free streaming per week before asking you to pay a $5 or $10 monthly fee to continue listening – and it features tracks from EMI, Sony and many indies. The Echo Nest and its API allow developers to create really amazing apps but the problem was that up until now many of those never saw the light of day because app developers had to negotiate licensing deals for the music on their own and most of them did not want to hear of it or didn’t have the resources to delve in such a complex field. By partnering with Play.me the Echo Nest is providing its developers with an invaluable source of pre-cleared music that presents the same restrictions and limitations of the original service. The great thing though is that if users decided to pay for the premium access through the app or because they are using the app all the time both the App developer and the Echo Nest will receive a cut of that. The ability of tapping into this vast amount of music is likely to spur the release of many more apps based on the EchoNest platform – as a Wired article points out – and the developers will be able to focus on creating amazing programs rather than worrying about other issues. I’m personally a big fan of the Echo Nest and see endless potential to what people can do with their engine so I can’t wait to see some of these new apps!

4) And finally I’d like to end the show with some flash coverage of The great escape conference that took place last week-end in Brighton:

a) Best of British Music Start-up and the Psonar controversy,

First of all let’s talk about the Best of British Digital Music Start-ups session. This involved Silence Media, Psonar, Music Metric, Music Glue, Pledge Music and RjDj. These represent a wide variety of business models with the advertising platform, music locker service, direct-to-fan marketing and music app development all in the picture. But a company that caused a little bit of controversy as reported by Music Ally and Mobile Entertainment was Psonar. Psonar is a music locker service that works in principle in a way not dissimilar to other companies like Tunesbag for example. It lets users upload their entire music collection and then listen to it from any device – thus creating your own mini version of Spotify. The interesting thing is that you can browse other people’s collections and search for tracks that are not part of yours – the catch being that you can only listen to 30 seconds of any given track. The company then provides you with a link to buy the track from a legitimate store if you realize that you like it. Naturally music locker services have come under fire lately as there is no proof that the music that is uploaded is actually yours and has been acquired by legitimate means. Mobile Entertainment reports that Mark Mulligan – analyst at Forrester who was also one of the judges for the session remarked on the lack of licenses for the service and on how it’s effectively becoming an enemy of the labels that should instead be partners. Francis Keeling also remarked on the fact that the company is not legally able to do what they are doing when the discussion was opened to questions from the floor. I personally think that music lockers are just a phase – why if you have the option of having all the music that was ever made on one service like spotify would you go through the trouble of pirating the music and then uploading it all to a server in the cloud? it seems like many users would choose the convenience of paying a monthly fee and not being limited by the size of their own collections. I may be wrong – but unless someone like Apple comes up with a working model of the locker that gets over the licensing hurdles of proof of ownership I see the future as being a service like Spotify or We7 and not a locker service.

b) Francis Keeling VP of Digital At UMGI

Francis Keeling – the VP of Digital at Universal Music Group International took part in one of the sessions at the Great Escape and his remarks were reported by a number of outlets including the BBC and Bilboard Business. According to Billboard, Keeling stressed his belief in subscription models like  Spotify, backed the freemium model and remarked on how the slow pace of acquiring licenses is essentially stalling the industry. The BBC article instead focused on Keeling’s take on Piracy – that is still clearly seen as a number one enemy in the creation of a healthy business – a problem that needs to be tackled especially in those countries, like Spain and Italy, where there is the feeling the music is free and therefore there is no reason to buy it. Keeling also backed the Digital Economy Act – telling delegates on the subject of the yet-to-be-determined sanctions that “The solution needs to be fair, proportionate and implemented well,”

c) China and the music industry through the eyes of young entrepreneurs http://newsblog.thecmuwebsite.com/post/The-Great-Escape-UK-music-entrepreneurs-on-the-potential-of-china.aspx

And finally there is a really interesting article on the CMU website about the session focusing on the Chinese music market. This year five of the participants in the Brit Council’s UK Young Music Entrepreneur Award were selected to take a trip to China at the British Council’s expense in order to understand the market and develop business proposals that could expand their own companies into China. These included representatives from well-known companies like Mixcloud and Songkick. The participants found several issues that stifle the development of a healthy music market in China. First of all although the population is around a billion – that does not mean that there are a billion music fans and although the music scene is expanding it’s still an underground phenomenon, second there is lesser chance of endorsement by large international brands because of the success of local equivalents such as Baidu for example, third even though the number of music events has increased exponentially there are still only 5,000 concerts per year, fourth the issue of government control and censorship is still a pressing one. Nevertheless in spite of the challenges – all five participants remarked on how many opportunities there are in China to create a business and expand it quickly given that many of the major players that already dominate the market in the west are simply not there. Certainly an interesting experiment from the British Council!

Digital Music Trends – Episode 45

This Week: an interview with Kami Knake, host of the Bands Under the Radar (BUTR) music Podcast as well as being a consultant for Topspin, Brite Revolution and Mobile Roadie. In the news: Warner Music quarter one figures reveal digital revenues gaining weight, Google sues a small US label seeking a court ruling that would once and for all declare that the corporation is not liable for including copyright infringing search results, digital distributor Tunecore shows with its latest figures that the album may indeed be a dead format, the Ning platform is going to phase out free and to conclude a revenues update from RealNetworks.  

Episode 45 by digitalmusictrends

But let’s start with this week’s interview with Kami Knake. 

And thanks again to Kami for taking part in the show! And now for the news: 

Warner Music Quarter One figures
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704370704575227853370120376.html?mod=WSJ_business_whatsNews

http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/05/06/warner-music-reduces-loses-reports-rise-in-digital-sales/


This week Warner Music posted its first quarter revenues. The company has lost 25 million dollars for the quarter ending on March the 31st, which compares favourably with the 68 million dollars loss posted for the same quarter a year earlier. The result, though not brilliant, outperformed market expectations and it only equates to a loss of 17 cents per share, whilst a loss of 30 cents per share was widely expected. The digital revenues are becoming more and more important for the company. The Examiner reports that the company’s digital revenue grew by almost 14 percent over the prior-year earning and amounts to $117 million domestically, accounting for 46.8 percent of the company’s sales, up from 41% a year ago. Warner also benefits from a lesser involvement in the funding of tech music start-ups that had in the past couple of years resulted in the company losing several million dollars in investments. Billboard business reports a few interesting quotes from the Chairman and CEO of Warner Music Edgar Bronfman Junior. He expressed his confidence that the value of the digital products will rise as more ISPs start looking at providing content to their customers. Also in his words you can read the struggle of the industry towards Apple. On the one side Apple is still a huge player and the value of its devices as a legitimate way to acquire content is certainly appealing to the industry, as is the fact that the iTunes store is not based on special discounts or offers. At the same time the industry welcomes competition to apple’s dominance, both in terms of hardware and services. So I guess they are worried about losing the income that comes from iTunes right now but they would not mind if another company was to come in and start generating part of that income instead of iTunes reducing its market share, since this would also weaken Apple’s negotiating power.

Google is looking for judicial clarity by effectively suing a small indie label.

http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/content_display/industry/e3i8f1f42046a622bdab320f8d7ef599b73

Google made a bold move last week and decided to effectively sue Blue Destiny Records, a small blues label based in Florida. But wait a second, why is google bothering? Well, because there is quite a bit of back-story to this. Blue Destiny had sued google, Microsoft and Rapidshare, stating that google and Microsoft were favoring the exchange of copyrighted material by offering search results which consisted effectively of rapidshare links that were offering that content. Blue Destiny then withdrew its suit in March – the articles I read do not state exactly why that was. In short, Google decided it was time once and for all to have a court rule that they do not have responsibility for the links provided in the search results in case these lead to copyright infringing material, so it decided to file a counter-suit in a court in California which apparently would be more friendly to Google’s arguments than, say, one in Arizona. google is asking the court to provide declaratory judgement as to whether links to cyberlockers constitute infringement or not. So from what I understand the suit is not against the label itself, but it’s a way of settling a debate that had been left hanging in the air and set a precedent with the courts that providing links to site such as Rapidshare does not in itself constitute infringement. Problem google versus Blue Destiny equals to David versus Goliath – let’s not forget as billboard points out that Google’s revenues are much larger than the entire revenue of the world’s entire music industry. This is both a smart and very dangerous move for Google – as flexing their legal muscles will make it very clear that there is no way of winning against a corporation as powerful as they are and could generate a backlash. 

Ning moves away from free, reveals pricing details. 

New Pricing

Ning, one of the biggest Web 2.0 success stories of the past couple of years is phasing out its free service and community administrators have until July to start paying or their communities will be shut down. This will not affect some 10,000 networks which were started by educators and will remain free. This is a story that was covered quite a bit on mainstream media including Fortune and New York Times blog, since it represents the crumbling of the web 2.0 free model. Ning was hailed as a great success, it had 120 million dollars of VC funding behind it and was at one point valued over 750 million dollars. It allowed you to create your own social network and your own community online and the process was free – although to access certain features you had to pay a premium. The model was based on the payments made by this small percentage of premium users and on advertising. But neither of those income streams were enough to keep the company afloat, as the Fortune article points out three quarters of the revenues were coming from 6% of the company’s networks, and Jason Rosenthal who took over from Gina Bianchini and became CEO of the company about two months ago had to take this radical step as a last ditch effort to give the company a chance of becoming profitable. The lesson here is that perhaps the free model that was so important to the boom of Web 2.0 is not sustainable if it’s not supported by a sound business model or if it does not generate the kind of attention that the Facebooks and Twitters of this world are receiving right now. The platform is introducing three price tiers going from $2.95 a month to $49.95 depending on the size of the community. Also the company is planning to scrap advertising for the site, hoping to more than offset the loss through the new subscription income. Ning is also willing to help communities transfer onto different services if they decide they don’t want to pay the fees. This is a very brave move for the company, because with the Internet being as volatile as it is it’s easy to see many of the smaller groups disappear and move onto other services. It’s going to be interesting to see how music groups react to this, as many artists have created their own social network on Ning and I wonder whether these changes will affect them at all. If you are an artist out there and these changes are affecting you please email me at digitalmusictrends@gmail.com

Tunecore
http://www.billboard.biz/bbbiz/content_display/industry/e3i5a1636af3715b03bd05d47fc3de05830

Digital distributor Tunecore revealed its 2009 figures which show that independent artists are starting to achieve significant sales through the numerous outlets offered by the company. 
Interestingly, even though a lot of the artists distributed by Tunecore are unsigned, album sales account only for 2.3% of sales. This for me is a surprising figure that shows that music buyers are now so used to the single-track download that they adopt the same behaviour for small “cult” bands as they do for major single-driven acts. I would have definately placed my bets on higher album sales for Tunecore compared to the rest of the industry because I would have though that the average Tunecore artist would engage with its audience in a way that draws them to buy into the whole project. Actually I was just writing down these thoughts when I saw an Ars Technica article pop up on Google which highlights exactly this and is entitled The Death of the Album (in handy graph form), the link is in the show-notes. 

Streams are definitely rising and represent 57% of sales, whilst single track downloads, though definitely growing in terms of number, only made up 40% of units. One thing that I personally found confusing about the articles covering this story is that although the incredibly poor performance of the albums is evident the graphs refer to the number of tracks sold as singles, sold as albums or streamed. This naturally in no way relates to the income that was generated by those assets, because I would bet that even though streams represent 57% of sales they didn’t generate a great deal more if at all more than the 2.3% of album sales and that the lion’s share of the income came from single sales. Unfortunately I could not find a link to the actual figures relating the number of sales to the dollars generated so at this stage it’s all speculation…
Billboard Business also reports that the company has entered a partnership with Myspace that will allow any band with a Myspace account to receive a half price discount on Tunecore’s services – which means pretty much every band on the planet will be able to take advantage of this offer. Also, users taking advantage of this offer will also receive $50 in MyAds credits so they will be able to advertise the release on MySpace. I personally have never used the Myspace advertising platform though I’ve used Facebook’s ads several times. If you have any experience advertising your own project or band drop me a line, it’d be interesting to know if it was useful or not! 

RealNetworks

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSN0612500220100506

And finally let’s close with another quarterly earnings report from RealNetworks. Although revenue fell 9% to 128.6 million dollars, the net profits rose from a loss of 12.1 millions a year earlier to a profit of 3.2 millions. The revenues actually beat analysts expectations but Rhapsody as a service is still having a hard time, having lost another 25,000 subscribers. AP reports that even though the company has reduced the subscription price by 5 dollars and implemented changes in its mobile application that allow for the cashing of tracks on mobile for offline access this has not reversed the fortunes of the service whose ownership – as i reported earlier this year – is now evenly split between Viacom and RealNetworks, neither of whom is majority stakeholder. RealNetworks is a well-known name in the States as is Rhapsody,  but users don’t seem to be responding well to the subscription model given that their numbers are reducing. RealNetworks in fact, being now a separate company from Rhapsody is concentrating on producing a whole other host of web-related products including games. The lack of traction for Rhapsody may indicate that the public is not keen on subscription or – more likely – that other services have come along that more than fulfill their music needs, like Pandora for example. This is also interesting news for Spotify – the company is supposedly planning a roll-out of their service in the States in quarter three of 2010, and to succeed it needs the same momentum it achieved in markets like the UK for example. This momentum though could only be guaranteed by maintaining the free ad-funded feature that spurred its viral spread over here and was used to convert users to pay for the monthly subscription which includes mobile access. At the moment though it is not clear whether Spotify will be introducing a free version in the States – a factor that could greatly reduce its viral spread. The first question is – do people want subscription? And the second is – is a service in this space by Apple likely to kill all competition in a short amount of time? The second question is interesting in that if the majors felt that they could get more money through a successful Spotify (let’s not forget that all the majors have a steak in the company) than from an Apple-led subscription model – they could ostracize a streaming deal with Apple to prevent their service from killing off Spotify before it even has a chance. As far as I can understand the agreements that Lala had with major labels do not automatically transfer to Apple so the terms and fees paid for streaming and other cloud-based services would have to be renegotiated. It’s definitely an interesting time for streaming models…

Don’t forget that I will be at the Future Music Camp in Manheim in the last weekend of May so if you are planning to attend drop me an email (digitalmusictrends@gmail.com)
Have a great week and ’till next time!

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